Pilots

Pilots

Your Pilot Path profile is automatically
searched with each new job listing

Your Pilot Path profile is automatically searched with each new job listing

Fast access to more jobs!

We know how challenging it is to find a job in aviation.

Pilot Path gives you access to positions that match your aeronautical experience as soon as they become available.

You are notified of these jobs and get to decide if you want to express interest or not.

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
1

Create your free profile, capturing all your aeronautical experience and employment history.

 Update it any time.

 Access your free professionally formatted resume any time.

2

Your details are searched with every new job listing created

3

If you meet any of the employer minimums, your details are displayed in their search results.

 For confidentiality, only your aeronautical experience is displayed (no names, contact details, employer history, referees etc)

4

Employers select all pilots that they are interested in.

5

Pilots are notified of these jobs and can accept or reject interest.

 Accepting interest allows the employer to view your full profile.

 Rejecting the job removes you from the employer list.

6

Employers can now view your full profile and create a shortlist to interview.

 

 Pilots are notified if they were surpassed, or if they made the shortlist.

7

Employers interview the shortlist and issue job offers.

 

 Pilots are notified if they were surpassed, or if they have been offered the job.

Cadetship with an airline
Become an Instructor
Become a General Aviation Charter Pilot
Cadetship with an airline

 The most expensive path

 This is deducted from your salary once you start, or required to be paid back within a certain amount of time if you are not selected for employment

 Benefits include getting straight into an airline and having stable employment and progression

 Drawbacks include being bound to that organisation for a number of years, so should you want to leave, you will have a huge debt to pay off

Become an Instructor

 As most flying schools are located in major cities and towns, a benefit of being an instructor is that you may have a more favourable location (as opposed to a remote area, for an entry-level General Aviation pilot)

 There is also a lot of demand for instructors, so getting that first job is sometimes easier than that of a General Aviation charter pilot

 Many flying schools will employ you once you have completed your training, so you can go straight into that first job

 The instructor qualification may also come in useful later in your career as many aviation companies have internal check and training. Having an instructor rating may help you get the job over a candidate with no training approval

Become a General Aviation Charter Pilot

 For the majority of pilots this has proven to be the hardest, but often the most rewarding, path to take

While some General Aviation employers will take fresh CPL pilots, the first benchmark to pass for many aviation employers is 400-500 hours. Depending on your flying school, you may get close to this number of hours during your training

 Getting the first few jobs is often difficult and one can expect very low pay, demanding working conditions and periods of unemployment. That said, General Aviation charter pilots build important skills, often in remote areas, but these are highly regarded by future employers.

Pilots - Personal Development

Never stop learning or become complacent.

Always ask yourself “Was there anything I could have done better?”

Always back yourself and don’t take safety lightly.

Know your flight and duty times and ensure you remain compliant.

Understand your aircraft and its legal requirements to fly. Be prepared to say “No” to a flight if the aircraft is not serviceable, overloaded, or not suitable for another operational reason. Remember, if things go wrong, it’s your license that will be cancelled.

Your learning curve will be steep for the first few thousand hours. Always take the time to talk with other pilots, to learn from them.

Where possible, seek feedback from your colleagues, the Senior Base, or chief pilot. Positive feedback is good for morale and its always better to know of (and address) any potential issues, before you get to a review.

Pilots - Interviewing
Your resume
At the interview
Your resume

As a Pilot Path member, your resume will be available in a professional format that has been designed by pilots and employers.

 

It will contain all the information you need to be able to make a good impression for an interview.

 

Keep your reemployment history concise. Interviewers do not have much time to read long-winded resumes.

 

When writing your cover letter, make sure you know who to address.

At the interview

Ensure you know as much as possible about the company, its fleet and its operations. Being prepared shows your commitment to professionalism and ensures that you can relate your skills and the conversation to their operation.

 

Always present yourself - and your car - in a neat and tidy condition when job searching.

 

KNOW YOUR STUFF. Ensure you are totally proficient with your flying abilities, aircraft knowledge, rules and regulations. Interviewers are not there to trick you but gain an understanding of your abilities and knowledge.

 

Ensure that you have all your emergency procedures learnt by heart and can conduct them back to back in a check ride.

 

Try to relax and be yourself. All employers want to get a sense for who you are as a person, as much as they want to see your flying ability. Personality has a lot to do with the selection process all the way through your flying career.

Choosing the training organisation is possibly the most costly and probably the most important decision of your flying career. There are a number of options:

Full time courses offered by flying schools
University Degree, majoring in Aviation
Cadetship with an airline
Full time courses offered by flying schools

This offers the quickest way to get into aviation, taking 12 months.

Choose your flying school carefully.

Ground theory covers PPL, CPL and in some cases ATPL.

Completing all your study before you start your career has the following benefits:

Finding the time and money on the starting GA pilots wage is very difficult.


Some employers require a Multi-Engine Instrument Rating or ATPL subject completed, so you won't miss out on any potential jobs.


With most flying schools, you’ll graduate with a Diploma in Aviation.

University Degree, majoring in Aviation

This path takes approx. 3 years.

The benefit is that you will graduate with a degree and this is often looked at favourably by employers, particularly airlines.

It also provides you with additional skills and training, should you not proceed with a career in aviation.

Cadetship with an airline

The most expensive path.

This is deducted from your salary once you start, or required to be paid back within a certain amount of time if you are not selected for employment.

Benefits include getting straight into an airline and having stable employment and progression.

Drawbacks include being bound to that organisation for a number of years, so should you want to leave, you will have a huge debt to pay off.

Want to know more? Register Now!

We’re still building this amazing platform, so register your interest and be kept up to date on our news and progress.
You’ll be the first to get access to the site!